TITLE

Abstinence and Birth Control Among Rural Adolescents in Impoverished Families: A Test of Theoretical Discriminators

AUTHOR(S)
Benda, Brent B.; Corwyn, Robert Flynn
PUB. DATE
June 1999
SOURCE
Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal;Jun99, Vol. 16 Issue 3, p191
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This was a study of 357 adolescents who resided with AFDC families in ten rural counties in Arkansas. The study examined predictors of birth control from sociodemographic variables, control, strain and differential association theories. This was the first theoretically-based investigation of abstinence and birth control among adolescents living with families on welfare in impoverished rural communities. Bivariate analyses indicated that all of the study factors, with the marginal exception of attachment to father, showed significance variance between the three groups of adolescents who had not had sexual intercourse, those who always used birth control, and those who did not always use birth control. The first function of the discriminant analysis discriminated between youth who had not had sexual intercourse and those who were sexually active, and indicated that the former (in order of discrimination) were younger, had fewer sexually active friends or family members, were more religious, had more fear of giving birth if sexually active, and had stronger beliefs in the moral validity of societal laws and norms. The second function discriminated between those who always used birth control and youth who did not always use birth control. The significant discriminators (in order of discrimination) showed that adolescents who always used birth control attended church more often, were more likely to be persons of color than Caucasian, had closer attachments to their mothers, and presently did not desire a baby to love. Social work implications of these findings are discussed from an ecological perspective.
ACCESSION #
2242915

 

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