TITLE

School Completers and Noncompleters With Learning Disabilities: Similarities in Academic Achievement and Perceptions of Self and Teachers

AUTHOR(S)
Bear, George G.; Kortering, Larry J.; Braziel, Patricia
PUB. DATE
September 2006
SOURCE
Remedial & Special Education;Sep/Oct2006, Vol. 27 Issue 5, p293
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Although academic and behavioral problems place many students with learning disabilities (LD) at risk for not completing high school, we know very little about the differences between children with LD who complete school and those who fail to do so. In this study of 76 male youth (45 school completers and 31 noncompleters), standardized measures were used to examine academic achievement and intellectual ability, and self-report measures were used to examine global self-worth, satisfaction about reading and behavior, and relations with teachers. Although we predicted that noncompleters would score lower than completers on most of these measures, no significant differences were found. Implications of these results are discussed.
ACCESSION #
22421953

 

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