TITLE

The Generals Need to Say No

AUTHOR(S)
Craft, Major J. A.
PUB. DATE
September 1999
SOURCE
U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings;Sep99, Vol. 125 Issue 9, p70
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses problems in retaining experienced members of the United States Marine Corps. Patterns of marine retention; Reasons behind the exodus of Marine aviators; Emphasis on providing for the needs of soldiers' families.
ACCESSION #
2241289

 

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