TITLE

Fundus Autofluorescence Before and After Photodynamic Therapy for Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

AUTHOR(S)
Framme, Carsten; Bunse, Arnd; Sofroni, Renata; Thalhammer, Thomas; Walter, Andreas; Sachs, Helmut G.; Gabel, Veit-Peter
PUB. DATE
September 2006
SOURCE
Ophthalmic Surgery, Lasers & Imaging;Sep/Oct2006, Vol. 37 Issue 5, p406
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To describe fundus autofluorescence patterns in choroidal neovascularization secondary to age-related macular degeneration before and after photodynamic therapy (PDT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-eight consecutive eyes were indicated for PDT after standard fluorescein angiography, which showed completely classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV) (n = 52), occult with no classic CNV (n = 7), and predominantly classic CNV (n = 9). Standardized PDT was performed and patients were examined 2 to 3 months later. Angiography and autofluorescence measurements were performed again and compared with preoperative values. RESULTS: At baseline, autofluorescence was mainly decreased in areas of completely classic CNV (79%), but showed a regular or mottled pattern in occult CNV. A slightly increased (50%) or normal (50%) autofluorescence was seen at the rim of the classic lesions within the junctional zone. Membrane demarcation was improved (90%) in classic membranes 2 to 3 months after PDT. After PDT for occult membranes, a transformation into classic membranes with residual leakage and need for further PDT was observed (6 of 7 eyes), showing the described autofluorescence patterns. For the mixed type of CNV, both described patterns of autofluorescence distribution were found. CONCLUSION: Especially classic CNVs reveal distinct characteristics of significantly decreased autofluorescence, presumably due to their localization above the retinal pigment epithelium level, leading to blockage of autofluorescence. Autofluorescence patterns after PDT included enhanced demarcation of the membrane, suggesting reactive retinal pigment epithelial changes. Autofluorescence might be an interesting tool to distinguish noninvasively between classic and occult CNV in age-related macular degeneration and to monitor changes after PDT.
ACCESSION #
22274612

 

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