TITLE

Green Tea and the "Asian Paradox."

PUB. DATE
September 2006
SOURCE
Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter;Sep2006, Vol. 24 Issue 7, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article looks at the positive effects of green tea consumption. Catechin antioxidants that are plentiful in Asian-preferred green tea, which is less processed than the black tea popular in the U.S., may have some protective effect against lung cancer and heart disease. The Yale University study focused mostly on Japan and Korea. China has a higher coronary death rate than the U.S., and Japanese and American men are about equally prone to die of lung cancer.
ACCESSION #
22188659

 

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