TITLE

NEWSBITES

PUB. DATE
August 2006
SOURCE
American Indian Report;Aug2006, Vol. 22 Issue 8, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This section presents two news briefs related to the Indians of North America as of August 2006. The organizers of the mountain sculpture called the Crazy Horse memorial are planning to kick off a fund drive for the completion of the project. A major agreement was announced by the Yurok tribe of Northern California and the U.S. Department of the Interior to cooperate in the management of land and fishery resources in the Klamath Basin.
ACCESSION #
22167896

 

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