TITLE

Patent nonsense: Evidence tells of an industry out of social control

AUTHOR(S)
Mintzberg, Henry
PUB. DATE
August 2006
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;8/15/2006, Vol. 175 Issue 4, special section p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article the author's views that the drug industry is out of social control. Granting the public monopolies via patent protection to private companies is said to be one reason for this. These monopolies are granted for products that can determine the life or death of the user and which lack price control. The author criticizes the current situation of the patent-dependent pharmaceutical industry as unacceptable, shameful, and says that it will continue until a change by the citizens is initiated.
ACCESSION #
22081561

 

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