TITLE

Pandemic threat overblown by both experts and media

AUTHOR(S)
Andresen, Margot
PUB. DATE
August 2006
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;8/15/2006, Vol. 175 Issue 4, p341
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the concern expressed by Dr. Richard Schabas, former chief medical officer of health for Ontario, Canada regarding the exaggerated media reports about SARS and Avian Flu. Schabas aired his views at a conference, suggesting the best ways of informing the public in the event of influenza pandemic. The arguments of some of the journalists and health experts present at the conference are also presented.
ACCESSION #
22079747

 

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