TITLE

Organic compensation anomaly prompts TB slaughter refusal

PUB. DATE
July 2006
SOURCE
Farmers Weekly;7/21/2006, Vol. 145 Issue 3, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the refusal of Rory O'Connor, an organic dairy farmer at Lower Kerswill Farm in Devon, England, to let the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs slaughter a TB reactor on his farm until it agrees to pay a fair level of compensation for the organic sector. O'Connor, who claims that the process is unfair and illegal, has written to the State Veterinary Service requesting that the rules be changed immediately.
ACCESSION #
21803964

 

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