TITLE

FAA's Blakey: No Consensus on Plan For Air Traffic Control Upgrades

AUTHOR(S)
Sanchez, Humberto
PUB. DATE
July 2006
SOURCE
Bond Buyer;7/26/2006, Vol. 357 Issue 32431, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that Marion C. Blakey, an administrator at the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), has pointed out that disagreements within the Bush Administration have forced it to modify its proposal which it has submitted to Congress. This includes a plan that could employ bonds to finance the cost of upgrading the country's air traffic control system with next-generation technology.
ACCESSION #
21801071

 

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