TITLE

The Bristol Institute of Hellenic and Roman Studies

PUB. DATE
March 1998
SOURCE
International Journal of the Classical Tradition;Spring98, Vol. 4 Issue 4, p648
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the plans by the University of Bristol in England to open its Institute of Hellenic and Roman Studies to promote research into various aspects of studies in classical civilization. Topics include it sponsorship of a Visiting Professorship program at the university, patrons, such as Sir Jeremy Morse KCMG, who support the institute, as well as Bristol's educational and research programs in the Classical Tradition.
ACCESSION #
2179761

 

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