TITLE

Sexual dimorphism in Upper Palaeolithic hand stencils

AUTHOR(S)
Snow, Dean R.
PUB. DATE
June 2006
SOURCE
Antiquity;Jun2006, Vol. 80 Issue 308, p390
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Sexual roles in deep prehistory are among the most intriguing puzzles still to solve. Here the author shows how men and women can be distinguished by scientific measurement in the prints and stencils of the human hand that occur widely in Upper Palaeolithic art. Six hand stencils from four French caves are attributed to four adult females, an adult male, and a sub-adult male. Here we take a step closer to showing that both sexes are engaged in cave art and whatever dreams and rituals it implies.
ACCESSION #
21735721

 

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