TITLE

Failure to Launch

PUB. DATE
August 2006
SOURCE
National Review;8/7/2006, Vol. 58 Issue 14, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the July 4, 2006 test launch of a Taepodong-2 missile by North Korea; the missile broke apart shortly after launch. The author claims that although a sense of relief at the failure of the test launching is natural, Kim Jong Il's regime is a threat which the U.S. ought to deal with militarily.
ACCESSION #
21678116

 

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