TITLE

The Development of Proto-Performative Utterances in Deaf Toddlers

AUTHOR(S)
Lichtert, Guido F.; Loncke, Filip T.
PUB. DATE
June 2006
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Jun2006, Vol. 49 Issue 3, p486
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the development of proto-imperative and proto-declarative utterances in normally developing, non-neonatally screened, profoundly deaf toddlers. Method: Both types of proto-declarative are considered to be the most basic prelinguistic and early linguistic communicative functions. Eighteen normally developing, non-neonatally screened, profoundly deaf toddlers participated in a longitudinal study. All children were enrolled in the same oral-aural home guidance program. At the time of the study, none of the children had received a cochlear implant. At the ages of 18, 24, and 30 months, proto-imperative utterances were elicited using an adapted version of M. Casby and J. A. Cumpata's (1986) Protocol for the Assessment of Prelinguistic Intentional Communication. For eliciting proto-declarative intentions, a video clip was used. Results: Results revealed a significant increase in both frequency and level of utterances for both types of proto-performatives. Although there was a clear development from nonlinguistic toward linguistic communication, utterances remained predominantly deictic-gestural for the imperative intentions and referential-gestural for declaratives. Conclusions: The data support the notion from the literature that both types of performatives are susceptible to elicitation. Results also suggest that after neonatal screening, both total communication and oral-aural approaches might accelerate conventionalization of the earliest communicative utterances of profoundly deaf toddlers.
ACCESSION #
21659932

 

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