TITLE

Untitled

AUTHOR(S)
Odell, Dave
PUB. DATE
April 2006
SOURCE
New York State Conservationist;Apr2006, Vol. 60 Issue 5, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the sandhill crane which may be found in New York. Although breeding populations are found in Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and the Canadian prairies, cranes did not nest in New York in recent history. In 2003, the adults were spotted with two small colts, confirming for the first time that cranes bred successfully in New York. Since then, they have continued their success each year, and cranes have also been seen in other central and western New York locations.
ACCESSION #
21547763

 

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