TITLE

Willkie Is Slipping

PUB. DATE
September 1940
SOURCE
New Republic;9/16/40, Vol. 103 Issue 12, p372
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reflects on the political weaknesses of Wendell Willkie, the 1940 Republican presidential candidate in the U.S. Two months before the election, reports have emerged that his campaign is not going well. Analysts attributed the negative press releases to his indifference towards politicians in his own party, and his disregard for many people who were very enthusiastic about him in July.
ACCESSION #
21376518

 

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