TITLE

Temporal and spectral variation of desert dust and biomass burning aerosol scenes from 1995-2000 using GOME

AUTHOR(S)
De Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.; Aben, I.
PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics Discussions;2006, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p1321
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) and AAI-related residue data were used to investigate areas with UV-absorbing aerosols. Time series of regionally averaged residues show the seasonal variation and trends of aerosols and clouds in climatologically important parts of the globe. GOME spectra were used to study scenes containing specific types of aerosols. AAI data are specifically sensitive to biomass burning aerosols (BBA) and desert dust aerosols (DDA). Areas where these aerosols are regularly found were analysed to find spectral fingerprints in the ultraviolet (UV), visible and near-infrared (near-IR), to establish an aerosol type classification of BBA and DDA. Spectral residues are different for BBA and DDA, but over deserts the surface albedo is dominant beyond the UV and spectral residues cannot be used over land. Over oceans, about half of the BBA scenes show a very high reflectance that is never observed for DDA scenes. However, in the case of low reflectance scenes BBA and DDA cannot be distinguished. This is in part due to the microphysical and optical properties of biomass burning aerosols, which are highly variable in time, making it difficult to specify them spectrally as one type. Because of their high hygroscopicity BBA are often found in the presence of clouds, which disturb the spectrum of the scenes. Desert dust aerosols are much less hygroscopic and behave spectrally more uniformly.
ACCESSION #
21372324

 

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