TITLE

Could Mr. Willkie Defend Us?

PUB. DATE
August 1940
SOURCE
New Republic;8/19/40, Vol. 103 Issue 8, p232
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article questions if Wendell L. Willkie can defend the Americans in preparing the national defense or in the preparation of the U.S. for war. The author stresses that Willkie is certainly lacks the ability or skill to perform the task effectively. The task of preparing the national defense will lie with the working masses of the country. Other significant and compelling analyses of the author are presented.
ACCESSION #
21364565

 

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