TITLE

Can radar help defeat the diesel-electric sub?

AUTHOR(S)
Stevens, Pete
PUB. DATE
August 1999
SOURCE
U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings;Aug99, Vol. 125 Issue 8, p56
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the anti-submarine warfare (ASW) detection sensor requirements of the emerging diesel-electric submarines of the 1990s. Reductions in a submarine's detectability through air-independent propulsion systems; United States Naval radar systems' focus on Soviet-made submarine classes; Reductions in the US ASW budget after the Cold War; Different layers of the ASW environment.
ACCESSION #
2134077

 

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