TITLE

House Weighs $32B DHS Bill, With $497M for Airport Security

AUTHOR(S)
Sanchez, Humberto
PUB. DATE
May 2006
SOURCE
Bond Buyer;5/26/2006, Vol. 356 Issue 32390, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that the U.S. House is seeking to approve a $32.08 billion fiscal 2007 spending bill for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) with $497 million allocated for airport security. The nation's 429 busiest airports will absorb the grants to cover increased security costs resulting from legislation passed after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that requires them to screen all checked baggage for explosives. The legislation also includes $200 million for a DHS program that provides grants to port authorities to protect ports from potential terrorist attacks by enhancing security.
ACCESSION #
21043147

 

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