TITLE

ABANDONMENT

AUTHOR(S)
Marizco, Michael
PUB. DATE
May 2006
SOURCE
High Country News;5/15/2006, Vol. 38 Issue 9, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the Mexican workers who are migrating towards north as they are not getting sufficient wages in Mexico. The workers who earn only about $8.50, for a full day of back breaking work in Mexico, can probably earn nearly $10 per hour by landscaping rich people's yards or hanging dry wall in homes in Phoenix or Tucson in Arizona. Even the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in Mexico could not solve the problems faced by the Mexican workers. By allowing goods and capital to cross borders more freely, NAFTA was intended to help the free market boost the economies of Canada, the United States and Mexico. This would flourish the Mexican economy and create jobs with higher wages and the Mexicans would have less incentive to emigrate north. But, things did not work as expected. Although NAFTA created at least 2 million new jobs in Mexico and raised the average salary of Mexican workers in export-related fields, but the burgeoning American economy continued to draw immigrants.
ACCESSION #
20904024

 

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