TITLE

Cluster headache in women: relation with menstruation, use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and menopause

AUTHOR(S)
van Vliet, J. A.; Favier, I.; Helmerhorst, F. M.; Haan, J.; Ferrari, M. D.
PUB. DATE
May 2006
SOURCE
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry;May2006, Vol. 77 Issue 5, p690
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In contrast with migraine, little is known about the relation between cluster headache and menstrual cycle, oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and menopause. A population based questionnaire study was performed among 224 female cluster headache patients, and the possible effect of hormonal influences on cluster headache attacks studied. For control data, a similar but adjusted questionnaire was sent to healthy volunteers and migraine patients. It was found that menstruation, use of oral contraceptives, pregnancy, and menopause had a much smaller influence on cluster headache attacks than in migraine. Cluster headache can, however, have a large impact on individual women, for example to refrain from having children.
ACCESSION #
20788378

 

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