TITLE

A Consistent Diffusion–Dissipation Parameterization in the ECHAM Climate Model

AUTHOR(S)
Burkhardt, Ulrike; Becker, Erich
PUB. DATE
April 2006
SOURCE
Monthly Weather Review;Apr2006, Vol. 134 Issue 4, p1194
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The diffusion–dissipation parameterizations usually adopted in GCMs are not physically consistent. Horizontal momentum diffusion, applied in the form of a hyperdiffusion, does not conserve angular momentum and the associated dissipative heating is commonly ignored. Dissipative heating associated with vertical momentum diffusion is often included, but in a way that is inconsistent with the second law of thermodynamics. New, physically consistent, dissipative heating schemes due to horizontal diffusion (Becker) and vertical diffusion (Becker, and Boville and Bretherton) have been developed and tested. These schemes have now been implemented in 19- and 39-level versions of the ECHAM4 climate model. The new horizontal scheme requires the replacement of the hyperdiffusion with a ∇2 scheme. Dissipation due to horizontal momentum diffusion is found to have maximum values in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere in midlatitudes and in the winter hemispheric sponge layer, resulting in a warming of the area around the tropopause and of the polar vortex in Northern Hemispheric winter. Dissipation associated with vertical momentum diffusion is largest in the boundary layer. The change in parameterization acts to strengthen the vertical diffusion and therefore the associated dissipative heating. Dissipation due to vertical momentum diffusion has an indirect effect on the upper-tropospheric/stratospheric temperature field in northern winter, which is to cool and strengthen the northern polar vortex. The warming in the area of the tropopause resulting from the change in both dissipation parameterizations is quite similar in both model versions, whereas the response in the temperature of the northern polar vortex depends on the model version.
ACCESSION #
20583474

 

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