TITLE

Phantom Force

AUTHOR(S)
Johnson, Scott; Dehghanpisheh, Babak
PUB. DATE
April 2006
SOURCE
Newsweek;4/24/2006, Vol. 147 Issue 17, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on a problematic militia in Iraq called "Facilities Protection Services" (FPS), which lacks any centralized control. The organization reportedly has 146,000 members, and has the same attire, weapons, and vehicles as the regular Iraqi police. The role of FPS in sectarian violence is discussed, as well as the difficulty of securing Iraq when citizens do not know whom to trust.
ACCESSION #
20490958

 

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