TITLE

A line in the sand

AUTHOR(S)
Chun, Rosaleen
PUB. DATE
July 1999
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;7/13/99, Vol. 161 Issue 1, p63
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses a case dealing with issues of patient confidentiality. Issues of HIV testing and confidentiality; Issues of next-of-kin and family confidentiality; Issues of relations between doctors and the family of the patient.
ACCESSION #
2042006

 

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