TITLE

Renewal: Facing a common enemy and buoyed by rising goodwill, Indonesia and the United States are restoring relations

AUTHOR(S)
Klamper, Amy
PUB. DATE
April 2006
SOURCE
Sea Power;Apr2006, Vol. 49 Issue 4, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the efforts made by the U.S. government to renew relations with Indonesia. The resumption of ties starts with the forfeiture of arms embargo to Jakarta, sending of a hospital ship to help devastated parts of the country brought about by tsunami, and the incoming economic and military assistance.
ACCESSION #
20396464

 

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