TITLE

A Study of the Presumptive Approach to Consent for Organ Donation

AUTHOR(S)
Zink, Sheldon; Wertlieb, Stacey
PUB. DATE
April 2006
SOURCE
Critical Care Nurse;Apr2006, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p129
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the philosophical perspective behind the shift from the standard approach to presumptive approach to consent in organ donation. History of organ donation and the standard approach; Elements of the presumptive approach that provide donation requestors a framework in which to understand presumptivity; Impact of presumptive approach on organ donation rates.
ACCESSION #
20342585

 

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