TITLE

End-of-Life Decision Making, Organ Donation, and Critical Care Nurses

AUTHOR(S)
Daly, Barbara J.
PUB. DATE
April 2006
SOURCE
Critical Care Nurse;Apr2006, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p78
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the current norms regarding end-of-life care and persistent areas of concern. Results of the "Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatment," an investigation into care processes among adults with life-threatening illnesses; Issues and factors associated with end-of-life care in the phase of organ donation; Role of critical care nurses in improving end-of-life care and organ donation.
ACCESSION #
20342572

 

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