TITLE

Chapter 2: Native American Symbolism

PUB. DATE
June 1999
SOURCE
Quilting & Applique;Jun1999, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents information on Native American symbolism. Importance of symbolism to tribes that has no written language; Meaning of symbols written by Indians such as wavy lines, pyramids, circles and other natural images; Symbolism of an eagle, buffalo, bear and rainbow; Details of the use of a peace pipe as a ceremony.
ACCESSION #
20321218

 

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