TITLE

Miller reconsiders gay-themed TV spot

AUTHOR(S)
Chura, Hillary
PUB. DATE
July 1999
SOURCE
Advertising Age;7/12/1999, Vol. 70 Issue 29, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports on the decision of Miller Brewing Co. to postpone the launch of a gay-specific television commercial for its beer, as of July 1999. It features the Barechest Men, male models from a popular Bay area calendar. The commercial was supposed to begin airing during the slot of QTV's Xposure Program, a San Francisco, California-based cable show that focuses on gay people. Miller is supposedly exploring options regarding the placement of the commercial. Beer marketers have been actively targeting gay consumers through sponsorships of local events and limited print advertising. The Miller commercial would mark the beer industry's first television spot specifically aimed at gay people in the U.S.
ACCESSION #
2024167

 

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