TITLE

Plant-Based Diets Help Lower Cholesterol

PUB. DATE
October 2004
SOURCE
Nutrition Health Review: The Consumer's Medical Journal;2004, Issue 92, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports that according to a study from Stanford University School of Medicine, a low-fat diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans has twice the cholesterol-lowering power of a conventional low-fat diet. The Stanford study broke new ground by comparing two patient groups eating different foods but identical amounts of total and saturated fat, protein, carbohydrate, and cholesterol. Thus, the levels of blood cholesterol change in the two groups are attributable to the different foods; dark-green salads and bean burritos, for example, versus iceberg lettuce and frozen pizza; not differences in saturated fat and cholesterol intake.
ACCESSION #
20228519

 

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