TITLE

Notes and Comment

PUB. DATE
March 1973
SOURCE
New Yorker;3/31/1973, Vol. 49 Issue 6, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article comments on the abrupt and sweeping government changes taking place at the hands of the executive branch in the U.S. in 1973. Key issues discussed include the high levels of political corruption, the unprecedented concentration of authority at the hands of the executive branch and the reduction of federal social services.
ACCESSION #
20082301

 

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