TITLE

Demographic Transition in the Maghreb

AUTHOR(S)
Sutton, Keith
PUB. DATE
April 1999
SOURCE
Geography;Apr99, Vol. 84 Issue 363, p111
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Recent statistics on birth rates and age-specific fertility rates allow projections through to near zero population growth for North Africa by the year 2025. Factors behind this transition include urbanization, the education of women and their greater participation in employment, and family planning. Another factor, whose potential was considered by Clarke in 1985, is the contribution of Maghreb immigrant families in Europe to changing value systems in their home communities, leading to fertility decline.
ACCESSION #
1998800

 

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