TITLE

Everybody's a movie critic

AUTHOR(S)
Dolliver, Mark
PUB. DATE
June 1999
SOURCE
Adweek Eastern Edition;6/21/1999, Vol. 40 Issue 25, p54
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the effects of violence in entertainment on teenagers. Motino pictures and teen violence; Aligning of brand of marketers.
ACCESSION #
1997346

 

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