TITLE

Collaboration: The Future of the Study of the Past

AUTHOR(S)
Lightfoot, Kent G.
PUB. DATE
December 2005
SOURCE
News from Native California;Winter2005/2006, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the increase in the number of archaeologists collaborating with Native peoples in North America. Collaborative archaeology will be consisted of individuals from different cultural backgrounds. A coordinated program that integrates tribal members in all aspects of archaeological research involves taking part in decision about the research questions and making contributions to the interpretation of the findings. It highlights the significant challenge in developing collaborative archaeological programs.
ACCESSION #
19971754

 

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