TITLE

African Trypanosomes: Will the Twain Meet?

AUTHOR(S)
Deresinski, Stan
PUB. DATE
March 2006
SOURCE
Clinical Infectious Diseases;3/15/2006, Vol. 42 Issue 6, preceding p739
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports about African Trypanosomes, a sleeping sickness dieses. The human African trypanosomiasis disease exists in two forms: One is caused by Trypanosoma brucei subspecies ganbienese. Western and Central Africa is mostly affected by this dieses. Second is caused by T. brucei subspecies rhodesiense and is endemic in areas of southern and eastern Africa. Infection caused by Trypanosoma brucei usually has a slowly progressive course, whereas the latter is associated with more acute and rapidly progressive disease. Uganda is the only country where both forms of the disease exists.
ACCESSION #
19957729

 

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