TITLE

Comparison of standard-dose and low-dose gemcitabine regimens in pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients: a prospective randomized trial

AUTHOR(S)
Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Suetomi, Yoichirou; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Ohyanagi, Harumasa; Nakai, Takuya; Yasuda, Chikao; Kudo, Masatoshi
PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
Journal of Gastroenterology;Jan2006, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p70
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background. A prospective, randomized study was performed to determine whether gemcitabine infusion at a low dose (250 mg/m²) is comparable or superior to the standard-dose infusion (1000 mg/m²) in terms of the survival period, clinical benefit, and frequency of adverse effects in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods. Twenty-five patients who were histologically proven to have locally advanced pancreatic cancer or pancreatic cancer with distant metastases were initially enrolled in the present study. They were treated with gemcitabine infusion at either a dose of 1000 mg/m² over 30 min (the standard regimen) on days 1, 8, and 15 of every 4-week cycle or at a dose of 250mg/m² over 30 min every week. Survival time, response rate, time to treatment failure, clinical benefit response, and adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Results. Twenty-one patients received gemcitabine for more than 1 month. The median survival period was 7.2 months for patients who received the low-dose infusion regimen, in contrast to 5.2 months for patients administered the standard-dose infusion regimen. The time to treatment failure was 5.6 months for patients in the low-dose infusion regimen, in contrast to 3.4 months for patients in the standard-dose infusion regimen. There were no significant differences in either survival time to time to treatment failure or clinical benefits between the two groups, but the incidence of adverse reactions in patients administered the low-dose therapy was significantly lower than that in patients receiving the standard-dose therapy (P < 0.05). In particular, patients in the standard infusion regimen group experienced more hematologic toxicity than those in the low-dose regimen. Conclusions. These findings suggest that the low-dose gemcitabine infusion regimen can be continuously administered to patients with locally advanced and systemically spreading pancreatic cancer because of its reduced toxicity, resulting in better quality of life and an improved safety profile as compared to the standard infusion treatment regimen.
ACCESSION #
19870728

 

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