TITLE

NASA's Stardust Review

PUB. DATE
March 2006
SOURCE
Weekly Reader News - Senior;3/3/2006, Vol. 84 Issue 20, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the completion of the journey in space of Stardust, a space probe launched by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration on February 7, 1999. Collection of space particles by Stardust through a comet; Description of the particles collected by Stardust; Expectations of researchers on the particles collected by Stardust.
ACCESSION #
19863973

 

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