TITLE

Course of symptoms and median nerve conduction values in workers performing repetitive jobs at risk for carpal tunnel syndrome

AUTHOR(S)
Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Mattioli, Stefano; Spagnolo, Maria Rosa; Violante, Francesco Saverio
PUB. DATE
March 2006
SOURCE
Occupational Medicine;Mar2006, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p115
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common occupational disorder associated with repetitive manual work. Little information exists about the possible relation between the variation of biomechanical hand/wrist exposure and the development of symptoms and median nerve conduction values.Aims To investigate the prevalence of CTS in a group of workers exposed to intensive use of the hands and the course of symptoms and median nerve conduction values after a period of reduced exposure to biomechanical risk factors.Methods CTS was assessed in assembly and non-assembly line workers by means of clinical examinations and nerve conduction studies (NCS). Ergonomic analysis was conducted for each assembly line workstation.Results Prevalence of CTS was significantly higher in assembly line workers compared to non-assembly line workers but there was a high prevalence of median nerve conduction abnormalities in both groups (60/102 hands and 40/110 hands, respectively). In a sizable proportion of both groups there was no relationship between symptoms and electrodiagnostic findings (45 hands and 48 hands in assembly and non-assembly line workers, respectively). When assembly line workers were re-examined after 2 years following a period of reduced work schedule, a significant proportion reported resolution of symptoms or had reverted to having normal NCS.Conclusions In our study, repetitive work was associated with a higher level of CTS and abnormal NCS. These findings appeared to be reversible following a period of less repetitive work. Overall, there was generally poor correlation between symptoms and electrodiagnostic findings.
ACCESSION #
19834840

 

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