TITLE

Gulls

AUTHOR(S)
Guthrie, Richard
PUB. DATE
June 1999
SOURCE
New York State Conservationist;Jun99, Vol. 53 Issue 6, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents information on aquatic birds called gulls in the state of New York. Places to view the birds; Description of the four common species of gulls; Rare gulls that visit New York during winter.
ACCESSION #
1979379

 

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