TITLE

IAFF: PASS Signals Fail at High Temps

PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
Fire Chief;Jan2006, Vol. 50 Issue 1, Special section p3
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that exposure to high-temperature environments may cause the loudness of personal alert safety systems alarms signals to be reduced, causing the alarm signal to become indistinguishable from background noise at the incident scene. This is the result of a study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program. It also reveals that PASS alarms were not heard or were barely audible during the investigation of four firefighter fatalities that occurred from 2001 to 2004.
ACCESSION #
19751878

 

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