TITLE

Slowdown

AUTHOR(S)
Morring Jr., Frank
PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
Aviation Week & Space Technology;1/30/2006, Vol. 164 Issue 5, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is trading an estimated six-month hit to its shuttle-replacement schedule by dropping plans to modify the shuttle main engine for the job, in exchange for long-term cost savings on the way to Mars. A decision to use a modern version of the Apollo-era J-2 upper stage engine to launch the planned Crew Exploration Vehicle will eliminate the need to develop a Space Shuttle Main Engine that can be started at altitude. That matches the solid-fuel requirement for the shuttle-derived heavy lifter to be used on lunar missions and has already been tested on the ground, so NASA won't have to maintain two different solid-fuel boosters as it works its way to the Moon.
ACCESSION #
19655780

 

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