TITLE

Punctuation Categories: Other- Military Commands

PUB. DATE
January 1991
SOURCE
Punctuation Thesaurus;1991, p303
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on pronunciation of English words used in military command. A military command frequently stands alone and represents a full sentence, even though not all of the parts of speech are in evidence. The other words are simply omitted and implied. Some commands contain dramatic pauses which are represented by a dash. The pronunciation of the word "March" is shortened. Few drill instructors can be heard pronouncing the consonant "M" when they say march. To convey the actual sound of some parts of a military command when writing dialogue, lengthening the word by adding identical letters and hyphens (-) can be effective.
ACCESSION #
19615271

 

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