TITLE

Clinical Presentation and Surgical Outcome in Patients With Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome

AUTHOR(S)
Hong Jo Choi; Eung Jin Shin; Yong Hee Hwang; Weiss, Eric G.; Nogueras, Juan J.; Wexner, Steven D.
PUB. DATE
December 2005
SOURCE
Surgical Innovation;Dec2005, Vol. 12 Issue 4, p307
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a poorly understood clinical condition, and the schema of treatment has not yet been defined. This study reviewed the clinical spectra and outcome of various surgical treatments in patients with solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. The medical records of all patients with solitary rectal ulcer syndrome between 1992 and 1998 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients in the study population with symptoms and histopathologic findings suggestive of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome were placed in the primary solitary rectal ulcer syndrome group, and patients who underwent surgery for other diseases in whom histopathology confirmed concomitant solitary rectal ulcer syndrome were in the incidental group. Clinical features and outcomes of surgical treatment were documented. Improvement was considered as resolution of presenting symptoms, and nonimprovement was considered if presenting symptoms persisted or worsened. The study cohort comprised 49 patients: 20 in the primary group and 29 in the incidental group. Ulcerative morphology was seen predominantly in the primary group (70%); erythematous (45%) and polypoid lesions (34%) were predominant in the incidental group (P = .0025). Clinical improvement after surgery was seen in 74% of patients with primary and 79% with incidental solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (P = NS). Manifestations such as tenesmus and digitation correlated with poorer outcome after surgery in both groups. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a clinical condition associated with functional anorectal evacuatory disorders. The results of this study show the positive role of surgical treatment for underlying functional disorders in the improvement of incidental solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.
ACCESSION #
19487620

 

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