TITLE

The practice of storybook reading to preschool children in mainstream New Zealand families

AUTHOR(S)
Phillips, Gwenneth; Mcnaughton, Stuart
PUB. DATE
June 1990
SOURCE
Reading Research Quarterly;Summer1990, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p196
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The authors investigated the social practice of book reading in 10 mainstream New Zealand families where parents read regularly to their 3- and 4-year-old children in their homes. In Study 1, the researchers collected data for one month on the frequency of book reading, the time of day, the participants, and the types of books selected. They found that reading stories was a frequent child-centered event in the homes studied. In Study 2, unfamiliar hut similar storybooks were given to the families to read, and the parent-child interactions were recorded and analyzed. Both adult- and child-initiated insertions most often focused on the meaning of the immediate text, particularly on the events and goals of the narrative. Few interactions focused on concepts about print or illustrations. Some changes occurred across successive readings: At first, parents concentrated on making the meaning of the story clear to the children, but later they frequently fostered anticipation and prompted the children to make inferences. The results suggest that children from such mainstream families in New Zealand will already have some knowledge of constructing meaning from stories when they begin to attend school.
ACCESSION #
19441769

 

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