TITLE

Contradictions in the Search for Authenticity

AUTHOR(S)
Pearson, Hugh
PUB. DATE
January 1999
SOURCE
Defining Ourselves: Black Writers in the 90s;1999, p107
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article argues that in the effort to search for authenticity, African Americans are unintentionally reinforcing an image of inferiority. As people of Black African descent engage in human history, there is a tendency to narrow horizons and ostracize the centers among us who acknowledge their connection to the rest of mankind. In the process, African Americans inadvertently contribute to their own oppression, feeding the notion that they are less intelligent than others.
ACCESSION #
19425522

 

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