TITLE

Keen for Gene

AUTHOR(S)
Peretz, Martin
PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
New Republic;1/16/2006, Vol. 234 Issue 1, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article gives the author's thoughts on Eugene McCarthy and his political history. When Eugene McCarthy died a month ago, I rushed to compose what I wished to be a meditation on what the man had meant to me, to my generation, and to our history. I first met Gene in the fall of 1967, when a group of antiwar activists went to Washington to meet the person who would be the beneficiary of the Dump Johnson movement that was to convene in Chicago a few weeks later. Truth be told, Gene was almost no one's first choice for that role. He had never cut his cloth to other people's designs, and his independent streak was more idiosyncratic than populist. He was available, but he did not flatter or pose. In his recent book, Eugene McCarthy: The Rise and Fall of Postwar American Liberalism, Dominic Sandbrook contends that McCarthy had the fundamental plans to deal with race and poverty, but the opposition won the minority vote by touching the emotional chords of black protest.
ACCESSION #
19413802

 

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