TITLE

'06 Olympic Ad Sales Set Record

AUTHOR(S)
Lafayette, Jon
PUB. DATE
December 2005
SOURCE
Television Week;12/19/2005, Vol. 24 Issue 51, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the record of $900 million worth of Winter Olympics advertising sold by NBC Universal for the games to be held in Turin, Italy. The 2005 Summer Games in Beijing, China are already 45 percent sold. The strength of the U.S. team boost interests of marketers in the Olympics. NBC is planning to launch NBCOlympics.com which will feature real-time results of the game.
ACCESSION #
19369718

 

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