TITLE

Ninth Circuit Limits NAGPRA to Remains Linked with Presently Existing Tribes

AUTHOR(S)
Musselman, Jenna
PUB. DATE
August 2005
SOURCE
Ecology Law Quarterly;2005, Vol. 32 Issue 3, p707
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses court rulings on cases where scientists in the U.S. challenged the interpretation of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and argued for the return of archaeological remains they wished to study. NAGPRA was enacted to respect the burial customs of American Indians. It gives jurisdiction to district courts over any action brought by any person alleging a violation of the statute. The remains are ascertained if they are Native American by means of a substantial connection to an American Indian tribe. NAGPRA does not apply if the remains do not meet the statutory definition.
ACCESSION #
19324128

 

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