TITLE

Toward Integration

AUTHOR(S)
Hsi-en Chen, Theodore
PUB. DATE
June 1941
SOURCE
Journal of Higher Education;Jun1941, Vol. 12 Issue 6, p307
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses curriculum planning related to better integration in the learning process in the U.S. Integration in education means the emphasis on the integration of personality, on the harmonious relation of the individual with his environment, on the intelligent assimilation of subject-matter by the learner, on the integrating functions of curriculum and teaching methods and others. The two features of college organization which act against the achievement of integration are the credit systems and narrow departmentalization. The credit systems has made college education a mechanical process of accumulating fragmentary credits and points. Fragmentarism is usually carried to such extremes at times that a student finds his time and effort scattered among seven or eight different courses, making integration almost impossible. Realizing the evils of the credit system colleges have made various attempts to organize courses by stating degree requirements in terms of courses instead of credits. Narrow departmentalization is another evil which arbitrarily divides knowledge into small segments whose relationship with one another becomes more obscure as emphasis for specialization in study increases. The colleges are trying to combine related departments into divisions in their efforts to curb the evils of narrow departmentalization.
ACCESSION #
19228455

 

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics